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11

Dec

Use Your flexible spending account (FSA) and celebrate the New Year with new glasses. Stanton Optical accepts flexible spending accounts and many vision and health insurance plans at each of their optical stores.

FSA’s allow you to appoint a portion of your pre-tax income, up to $2,500, into an account you can use to pay for medical expenses not covered by your regular health insurance plan. Flex plan funds are often used to pay for dental and eyecare expenses, such as copays and medical supplies, not covered under the employee’s health insurance plan.

Read the complete article; “Get Glasses for the New Year with Your FSA" on the Stanton Optical blog.

10

Dec

You can easily change many things about your appearance including your clothes, shoes, and accessories. Changing your hair color, skin tint, and eye color takes a little more work. Changing your eyes with colored contact lenses is something you should do only with advice from your optometrist.

Read the complete article; “Have Fun with Theatrical Contact Lenses" on the Stanton Optical blog.

09

Dec

Experts have long known that aging can cause vision impairment, and you could be among one of the 12 million Americans who need glasses or contacts and aren’t using any. If you’re starting to notice trouble reading the menu, you might be interested in the following old and new ways to treat your farsightedness.

Read the complete article, “Help, I Can’t Read the Menu Anymore" on the Stanton Optical blog. 

07

Dec

Photophobia, or light sensitivity, is one of the symptoms effecting migraine sufferers. Fluorescent lights, found inside shopping centers and office environments, may exacerbate the problem with light-sensitive vision. Therapeutic glasses, such as rose-tinted lenses, are being used with some success to lessen the effect of the light sensitivity.

Dr. Bradley Katz is an Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah. Dr. Katz is also one of the founders of Axon Optics where researchers are conducting clinical studies on a new style of glasses to help migraine patients. The lenses in the new eyeglasses are much clearer than previous models of migraine glasses which used darker tinted lenses.

Read the complete article, Headaches? Try Migraine Glasses, on the Stanton Optical blog. 

06

Dec

Scientists in Japan have discovered that blinking may cause the brain to temporarily tune out. Blinking is necessary to prevent our eyes from drying out and to remove any foreign substances, such as dirt, from the surface of the eye.

Research conducted at Osaka University in Japan suggests blinking causes the brain to go into a brief zen-like state before turning back on to a more focused state. It’s kind of like having a mini daydream anytime you blink your eyes.

Read the complete article, Does Blinking Cause Daydreaming, on the Stanton Optical blog. 

05

Dec

Stanton Optical is participating in the annual 2013 CHiPs for Kids Toy Drive now through December 19th. The official donation kickoff event takes place on Friday, December 6th from 5:30 am to 7 pm at the main gate of the Cal Expo in Sacramento, CA.
This is the second year Stanton Optical stores in the Sacramento, CA market have taken part in this event. 

Stanton Optical is participating in the annual 2013 CHiPs for Kids Toy Drive now through December 19th. The official donation kickoff event takes place on Friday, December 6th from 5:30 am to 7 pm at the main gate of the Cal Expo in Sacramento, CA.

This is the second year Stanton Optical stores in the Sacramento, CA market have taken part in this event. 

04

Dec

Corneal transplants are taken from a donor and given to a recipient. The damaged cornea is removed and replaced with a donor cornea. There are some risks with this type of procedure, including hemorrhage or infection of the transplant area. Some other complications can include development of cataracts or glaucoma, rejection of the transplant cornea by the body or an irregular astigmatism development.
See the original infographic, How Corneal Transplants Work, on the Stanton Optical blog. 

Corneal transplants are taken from a donor and given to a recipient. The damaged cornea is removed and replaced with a donor cornea. There are some risks with this type of procedure, including hemorrhage or infection of the transplant area. Some other complications can include development of cataracts or glaucoma, rejection of the transplant cornea by the body or an irregular astigmatism development.

See the original infographic, How Corneal Transplants Work, on the Stanton Optical blog. 

03

Dec

Did you know that everyone has a natural scotoma, or blind spot, in their vision? The small blind spot in each eye is located at the exact point where the optic nerve leaves the retina. This area is also called the optic disk, which is where the optic nerve head exits the retina in the back of the eye.

Read the complete article, What is the Human Blind Spot, on the Stanton Optical blog. 

21

Nov

Do you have trouble with your eyes in the morning? Baggy eyes, dark under-eye circles or itchy and irritated eyes are just a few the problems you may face at the beginning of each day. Find out the Top 5 Ways to Cure Puffy Eyes

20

Nov

An eye pressure monitor, or tonometer, is used during an eye examination as a way to screen for glaucoma. Read the complete article on the Stanton Optical blog: What is a Tonometer used for During an Eye Exam?